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Authentic Hungarian Walnut Rolls

Traditional Hungarian Walnut Roll

These traditional Hungarian Walnut Rolls are technically a Christmas cookie but I like to think of them as a Make-Any-Day-Better cookie. These Hungarian specialties are another one of my Husband’s favorite cookies from childhood. They utilize the same cream cheese dough as the Hungarian Apricot Kolaches but they taste remarkably different.

Traditional Hungarian Walnut Roll

When I first tasted them this Christmas, I knew these Walnut Rolls (or, as they are also called, Nut Horns) should not be restricted to Christmas to compete with the Gingerbread Boys, Snowballs, or Molasses Spice Cookies. No, no. They are waaay too special for that.

Traditional Hungarian Walnut Roll

This week when I found out that a friend, and lover of Hungarian treats, needed a good old-fashioned sugar pick me up, I jumped at the opportunity to bake him something close to his heart. These Hungarian Walnut Rolls have a delicately flakey yet rich crust, and an incredibly sweet, irresistible walnut filling! The outside of the roll in generously coated in sugar, which creates a sumptuous caramelized crust on the bottom and a crunchy, sugary sweet coating on top.

Traditional Hungarian Walnut Roll

These cookies are so delicious; my Husband braved the Atlanta snowstorm (on foot) to buy the creamcheese for the crust!

Traditional Hungarian Walnut Roll

They are like little bites of Heaven!

It took several tries around Christmastime to recreate these Walnut Rolls the way that my Husband remembers his Grandmother’s tasting, but I am happy to report that I have finally nailed it. Do not be deterred by the length of the instructions. They are really quite simple but I wanted to make sure you could recreate these magical cookies the first time!

Traditional Hungarian Walnut Roll

Aren’t they adorable?!

Like her Apricot Kolaches, my Husband’s Grandmother rolled her walnut rolls out in sugar and then sprinkled extra on top, because Grandma Szabo knew that more sugar is always better!

Traditional Hungarian Walnut Roll

Grandmother Szabo’s Walnut Rolls were apparently MUCH larger than these. She used a generous tablespoon of filling into the thinnest pastry imaginable. They taste equally amazing large or small.

I also threw a few of these Mini Chocolate Chip Cookies into the package because chocolate never hurts and they are irresistible!

I hear that they were gone in under 12 hours. I know mine were…

Authentic Hungarian Walnut Rolls

Yield: 64 Cookies

Authentic Hungarian Walnut Rolls

These traditional Hungarian cookies have a sweet, nutty filling inside a flakey, rich pastry! While they are traditionally made at Christmastime, they are outstanding any time of year!

Ingredients

    For the Pastry:
  • 2 ¼ cups all purpose flour
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • 8 oz cream cheese, room temperature
  • 1 cup unsalted butter, softened
  • ½ cup granulated sugar for rolling
  • For the Walnut Filling:
  • ½ pound freshly ground walnuts (finely)
  • 1 cup sugar
  • ½ cup of boiled milk
  • 1/8 cup melted butter

Instructions

    To make the Walnut Filling:
  1. Mix filling in a medium bowl using only ¼ cup of the boiled milk. The mixture should be thick.
  2. If the filling is not spreadable, use the rest of the milk. I used all of it. It will thicken as it sits.
  3. Note: You can make the filling ahead of time and freeze it until you are ready to use it. Just thaw at room temperature when you are ready to use.
  4. For the Pastry Dough:
  5. Sift flour and salt together in a medium bowl and set aside.
  6. Beat the cream cheese and butter together with a stand mixer or a hand mixer until completely incorporated and creamy (3-5 minutes).
  7. Reduce the speed of the mixer and slowly add in the flour. I used 5 additions and completely mixed in the flour each time. The dough will be soft but not sticky.
  8. Divide the dough into 4 equal parts and flatten each to ¾” thick. Wrap in plastic wrap and refrigerate until hard, at least 2 hours.
  9. Assembling the Walnut Rolls:
  10. Pre-heat the oven to 375°. Move the oven rack one setting higher than the center.
  11. Take one of the disks of dough from the refrigerator and lightly flour both sides. Spread granulated sugar on your pastry board or work surface. Place the dough on top and roll out pastry to 1/16” thick or as thin as possible. Most recipes say 1/8” but my Husband remembered them being thinner. Thinner is better. If you roll them too thick, the bottom will burn before the inside has a chance to fully cook and puff up. They still taste good but they taste so much better when properly rolled. Promise. Just trust me here.
  12. With a pastry wheel or sharp knife, trim the dough into a square and then cut the square into 16 smaller squares. My dough never rolled out into a perfect circle so I would just cut as many 1 1/2 “ squares a possible, saving the scraps for later.
  13. Place a dollop of filling in one corner of each square. I used ½ teaspoon.
  14. Starting in the corner with the filling, roll the dough around the filling from corner to corner, gently pressing down as you roll. Grab the roll on both sides and pinch as you bend the roll to create a crescent shape. Gently move it to a parchment covered baking sheet, placing the Rolls no closer than 1” apart.
  15. Repeat with all remaining squares.
  16. Sprinkle the middles of the Rolls with just a touch of granulated sugar.
  17. Bake 12-14 minutes or until the bottom edges are a golden and you can smell them. They should puff up slightly in the middle. With experience you can see when the dough is cooked. Let cool slightly on the pan on a wire rack and then move them gently to a wire rack to cool completely.
  18. Repeat with all remaining dough. Refrigerate and re-roll your scraps. Amazing.
  19. For a more traditional cookie, you can omit the granulated sugar and dust the final, cooled cookie with powdered sugar. I will warn you that it won’t be as divine.

Notes:

Note: Recipe from June Meyer’s Authentic Hungarian Heirloom Recipes Cookbook. The Walnut Filling recipe can also be found on her website. You can look forward to more Hungarian heirloom delicacies. I’m borderline obsessed!

The most difficult part about these cookies is storing them so that they don’t get soft. They will still taste yummy but the crispy flakey crust with the caramelized bottom is really sensational. I found that layering them between sheets of wax paper and then wrapping the stack loosely in foil will keep them as crisp as possible.

You don’t want to cut a corner and not re-roll your scraps. They make the best cookies because they have been rolled out twice in sugar!

https://americanheritagecooking.com/2014/02/authentic-hungarian-walnut-rolls/

Did you make this recipe? I want to hear all about it! 🥳Tag me on Instagram @cheflindseyfarr and use the hashtag #americanheritagecooking

Traditional Hungarian Walnut Roll

201 Comments

  • Phillip
    February 3, 2014 at 11:17 am

    These are beautiful – a work of art!

    Reply
    • AmericanCooking22
      February 3, 2014 at 11:19 am

      Thanks, Phillip! You’re too sweet!

      Reply
      • Nancy Trainer
        December 18, 2016 at 1:35 pm

        I love to read over the recipes also do some of them,but why do we have to scroll down six or more pictures of the same products, one picture and directions. should be fine.. Just wondering.. Thank you.

        Reply
        • Lindsey
          December 20, 2016 at 7:42 pm

          Hi Nancy, because that’s how this blog is. It’s my little piece of the internet and I like it that way 🙂 Happy baking! I hope you do try the recipes.

          Reply
          • Ellen Martell
            December 15, 2019 at 7:06 pm

            This is a new slant on an old family favorite. I like pecans actually rather than walnuts and I brush the cookies with egg white and sprinkled cinnamon sugar before baking for even more crunch. I always used a round cookie cutter and like your idea of little squares with decorative edges. Am trying that this year thanks Lindsey and Merry Christmas!!

        • Marcelle
          January 18, 2018 at 7:07 pm

          I wondered that also Nancy. Why so many duplicate pictures.

          Reply
          • Marion
            June 30, 2019 at 3:20 pm

            I am looking forward to making these cookies. Years ago I use to make something like these. We also used a ravioli cutter to cut them. It was a perfect square and had the pretty edges. Thank you for this recipe.

          • Lindsey
            August 3, 2019 at 9:51 am

            Thats a great idea!

    • Sissy
      November 21, 2016 at 12:58 pm

      Does the 1/2 pound of ground walnuts equal to 2 cups after grinding? Thank you

      Reply
      • Jenn
        December 16, 2017 at 11:04 am

        That’s such a good question – I was wondering same thing! Did you ever get an answer?

        Reply
        • Lindsey
          December 26, 2017 at 1:33 pm

          Hi Jenn, When I originally made this recipe I just used an 8oz bag of walnuts but my notes from work say that 2 cups ground walnuts = 225g = 7.9 oz, so I would say using 2 cups ground walnuts is a good substitute for weighing them. Happy baking!

          Reply
          • Linda
            March 14, 2018 at 11:39 pm

            I’ve made Tyra cookies for like 44+ years. I was taught by my husband’s grandmother who was Czechoslovakian how to make them and still make them every Christmas. Have become a family tradition! Also like her recipe for Czech fruit dumplings
            Truly Linda Seidl

          • Lindsey
            March 20, 2018 at 1:51 pm

            What wonderful memories to cherish, Linda! I’ll have to try the fruit dumplings!

      • Michele
        December 17, 2017 at 6:44 pm

        3.3 cups equals one pound

        Reply
      • Jeanne Adam
        December 25, 2017 at 10:39 am

        Right off the bat, I do not like walnuts in pounds, I LIKE cups!

        Reply
      • Lindsey
        December 26, 2017 at 1:31 pm

        Hi Sissy, That is a great question. I don’t think that I measured them in cups after. I just used a bag that was 8oz walnuts. My notes from work say that 2 cups of walnuts are 225g, which is 7.9oz.

        Reply
    • EUGENE JONAS
      December 18, 2017 at 9:29 pm

      my fathers mother came from hungry,when I was6 yrs old I used to watch her make those cookies,she taught my mother how to make,also my mother taught me to make them,as I used to help make them,grandma ,had a glack coal stove,in the 40
      ies,when I was 45 yrs old I made them for my motherthat would be in the mid 70 years always loved them,gene ej2TWCNY.RR.COM ALSOloved nut kolach and poppseed rolls

      Reply
      • Lindsey
        December 26, 2017 at 1:15 pm

        Thank you so much for taking the time to share your memories Eugene! I hope you try these and they remind you of your grandmother. Happy baking!

        Reply
  • Kayle (The Cooking Actress)
    February 3, 2014 at 9:18 pm

    awwwww they make me miss Christmas!

    Reply
    • AmericanCooking22
      February 4, 2014 at 8:36 am

      I know, right!

      Reply
  • dina
    February 4, 2014 at 12:20 am

    i love traditional cookies. these look amazing!

    Reply
    • AmericanCooking22
      February 4, 2014 at 8:37 am

      Thanks, dina!

      Reply
      • leanne
        December 9, 2014 at 10:07 am

        I would like to make these tomorrow….why the boiled milk and how long to boil?? Thanks

        Reply
        • AmericanCooking22
          December 9, 2014 at 10:21 am

          Hi leanne, Lots of old recipes call for boiled milk but now it isn’t important because our milk is pasteurized; however, in this recipe you do still want it to be hot. If memory serves, I heated mine up in the microwave. You don’t need to boil it down or boil it for any length of time – it’s just a gauge of temperature. If it isn’t hot enough the ingredients won’t incorporate. Hope that helps!

          Reply
          • Kim
            December 11, 2014 at 8:48 pm

            What is the name of your china pattern? It’s the pattern I picked out in 1985 but ended up registering for another. I can’t remember the name!

          • AmericanCooking22
            December 12, 2014 at 2:08 am

            I’m not sure, Kim! I got a few pieces at an estate sale 8 years ago! It is Vignaud Limoges, but as for the particular pattern, I’ve never been able to find it!

          • Liz
            January 15, 2015 at 3:48 pm

            My mom did hers totally different. She just had the walnuts, sugar, and egg whites. That’s all she did, nothing about boiled milk.

          • AmericanCooking22
            January 16, 2015 at 10:45 am

            Hi, Liz! I am sure there are many variations out there. I’ll have to give your mom’s a try! Sounds delicious!

        • Pat
          March 27, 2019 at 3:42 am

          U really only need to get the milk warm because it makes mixing the nut filling ingredients a little easier to mix well. The Walnuts absorb the milk as they sit. I usually make my nut filling night before the then in morning bring back out frig till almost room temp.

          Reply
  • Hungarian Chicken Paprikas with Homemade Spaetzle
    September 19, 2014 at 11:28 am

    […] maybe one bite of each dish and a cookie or three. Fair […]

    Reply
  • Kyla
    December 18, 2014 at 4:54 pm

    Do these freeze well after they are made?

    Reply
    • AmericanCooking22
      December 18, 2014 at 9:42 pm

      I have never tried to freeze them whole. I have frozen the filling and used it months later to make more, which worked very well! I do think they would freeze well. My great-grandmothers pecan tassies, that have a similar crust, freeze perfectly stacked with wax paper or parchment in between in a ziplock freezer bag or sealed container.

      Reply
      • Rae Solomon
        December 18, 2016 at 11:34 am

        they do freeze very well. Freeze them plain on top, sprinkle with the sugar when ready to bake

        Reply
  • sandra maria
    December 19, 2014 at 2:50 pm

    Oh my gosh! I remember these as a little girl, helping my mom bake them.she’s gone now but these are wonderful memories.god bless.

    Reply
    • AmericanCooking22
      December 20, 2014 at 11:50 pm

      Your comment made me smile! Have a blessed holiday! My husband and his brother also have very fond memories around these walnut rolls, so these and the apricot kolaches have a special place in our household! I hope you give them a try!

      Reply
      • Linda
        May 18, 2017 at 2:48 am

        The Limoges Vignaud bone china plate you used is the yellow floral pattern. So pretty

        Reply
        • Lindsey
          May 18, 2017 at 1:23 pm

          Hi Linda! Isn’t it just gorgeous!? I picked that one and a few tea cups up at an estate sale many years ago. I live for a good vintage find!

          Reply
  • jim
    December 23, 2014 at 5:49 pm

    My mother fixed these for me every christmas…when she died a year ago so did the receipt…now i can pass it on thanks to you..

    Reply
    • AmericanCooking22
      December 24, 2014 at 10:01 pm

      Such a lovely memory, Jim! Thank you so much for sharing! I hope you enjoy these cookies as much as we have.

      Reply
  • Nikki @ Tikkido
    December 26, 2014 at 3:43 pm

    This recipe is absolutely exceptional!! Rolling out dough in sugar is totally worth the extra mess and difficulty. That crisp, caramelized bottom really is everything you said and more. I am going to make these every year without fail, and my ancestors will undoubtedly speak of these cookies in hushed, reverent tones. They’re that good. Thank you so much for sharing!

    Reply
    • AmericanCooking22
      December 28, 2014 at 12:41 am

      Your comment totally made my day, Nikki! And it seriously cracked me up! I hope my ancestors will speak about these cookies in hushed, reverent tones! Thanks for trying them and stopping back to let me know!

      Reply
      • Alice
        July 14, 2018 at 5:08 pm

        Your ancestors will not! Your descendants might tho. 🙂

        Reply
    • kath
      March 16, 2017 at 9:47 am

      I roll mine in confection sugar. Get very good.

      Reply
  • Janie
    January 3, 2015 at 10:22 pm

    they are freezable if you follow her instructions for freezing the pecan tarts which I freeze the same way. I do the wax paper/ziplock and a freezer – safe container. I get sent both treats every holiday season by relatives. I try to make them last through the year 🙂

    Reply
    • AmericanCooking22
      January 4, 2015 at 10:58 pm

      How do you try to make them last throughout the year!?!? You are a stronger woman than I, Janie!

      Reply
  • Sande
    February 21, 2015 at 10:33 am

    I have fond memories of helping my grandmother makes these every Christmas. She would makes hundreds of them to share with family and friends. My mother made them a few times but felt it was way too time consuming for her. Sadly both of them passed without me getting a copy of the recipe. My grandmothers was in head and she never measured anything, so it was a couple handfuls of this and a couple dashes of that. I attempted many times over the years to duplicate the recipe or find it somewhere but never had much luck.

    Your recipe is very similar to what I remember with the only difference being the walnuts and boiled milk. She used black walnuts and canned evaporated milk. Can’t wait to try your recipe.

    Reply
    • AmericanCooking22
      February 23, 2015 at 8:37 pm

      Hi Sande! The best recipes are the ones that you know by heart! But that is definitely the risk of not writing it down. I couldn’t find black walnuts – I think you can only get them in season around here. But I can see evaporated milk working well. I hope you try them! If you do let me know how they compare!

      Reply
    • Dana Cinque
      May 10, 2017 at 8:33 am

      Absolutely one of my favorite recipes. I made them on Sunday and they were gone by Monday!

      Reply
      • Lindsey
        May 10, 2017 at 7:03 pm

        I am so happy to hear that Dana!!! Happy baking!

        Reply
  • Ilona lenart
    October 8, 2015 at 9:59 pm

    My mother, Irene made this walnut roll every Christmas. And she made about 100. She made them for us at home and her friends at Shoprite in Clark nj. Even I took some to work to treat my friends. Everyone who tried it wanted the recepi right away. And I always think of my mother, Irene when I make them. She passed in 2007. She was all Hungarian. We continue to cook and bake like she did. Everything Hungarian. Anyways, she made the best walnut rolls ever. And it was called Dios Kifli. Everyone should try to make it. They will love it!!!

    Reply
    • Lindsey
      October 18, 2015 at 1:46 pm

      100!!! These are the kind of cookies that you want to bake in large batches – just begging to be shared! I love Hungarian cooking – I’m not Hungarian but it is such comfort food. I would love to try any of your mother’s recipes if you are willing to share! Feel free to email me at americanheritagecooking@gmail.com

      Reply
    • Jennifer
      August 24, 2020 at 11:57 pm

      My Grandmother was also from Clark NJ and shopped at Shoprite. She made these every year for Christmas along with prune and apricot fillings. I loved them! I wonder if they knew each other since Clark was a small town. My grandmother was Josephine Laskowski.

      Reply
  • JL
    December 11, 2015 at 5:29 pm

    Grandma and her sisters were straight from Hungary, and this recipe is nothing like theirs. How can you possibly call this Hungarian?

    Reply
    • Lindsey
      December 13, 2015 at 3:21 pm

      There is never just one recipe for any particular dessert, so, obviously, it is normal that your grandmother’s recipe is different than this one. It doesn’t make mine or yours wrong – just different.

      Reply
      • JoAnn Beres Hertzig
        September 26, 2018 at 2:17 am

        There are as many variations of Kifli as there are bakers! I love my Hungarian church cookbooks. The variations are endless. But I have to wonder when cream cheese came in to existence. We never used it for Kifli and my recipe came over on the boat with my grandmother who was born in the 1800’s and the recipe came from HER mother. Just curious about the addition of cream cheese. Sorry if that doesn’t sound authentic, albeit still delicious.

        Reply
        • Lindsey
          October 4, 2018 at 5:18 pm

          Thats a totally valid question. My guess is that they probably used whatever version of cottege cheese they had available. There are other old world cheeses that are like cream cheese (Robiola for example) and its possible they used that. My ex-husband’s grandmother was off the boat and used cream cheese.

          Reply
          • Bob Hosh
            February 22, 2019 at 11:42 am

            Cream cheese is an American invention and played no role in authentic Hungarian food. Kifli recipes from the 19th and 20th century did not contain cheese, but some added sour cream. I would call this an authentic American-Hungarian recipe. I’ve had similar and they are delicious.!

          • Joy Andrea Weaver
            November 26, 2019 at 12:29 pm

            My hungarian nagymama off the boat also used cream cheese!

  • Terry
    December 11, 2015 at 11:58 pm

    My Mother, myself and now my two daughters make Hungarian Cookies every year at Christmas. The only thing different is that we use:

    2 lbs. flour
    2 lbs. cottage cheese
    2 lbs. butter

    We also fill them with anyone of the following: Walnut mixture – Poppy Seed mixture or jams. We also sprinkle with powdered sugar immediately after taking out of the oven! Yummy. Really enjoyed your recipe and how well others enjoyed these traditional cookies as much as my family does! Merry Christmas!

    Reply
    • Lindsey
      December 21, 2015 at 12:49 pm

      Hi Terry! Cottage Cheese sounds intriguing! I’ll have to give your recipe a try next year! Merry Christmas!

      Reply
    • Sandy
      September 7, 2017 at 8:37 pm

      My Mom made the same dough. She used walnuts and strawberry jam as the filling. They are so good, you just want another and another. Refrigerating the dough is important. Thank goodness for parchment paper when baking too.

      Reply
      • Cindy
        November 8, 2020 at 9:11 pm

        I’m excited that someone said you could fill these with something other than walnuts (I hate walnuts with a passion — it goes back to great-grandma and her monstrously huge walnut trees). I think I’m going to try this with strawberry jam.

        Reply
        • Lindsey
          November 10, 2020 at 5:26 pm

          Haha! You could also use the apricot filling from the apricot kolaches

          Reply
  • Jeanene
    December 21, 2015 at 10:31 pm

    Making these for a friend whose Hungarian heritage is calling. Wanted the ones with the nut filling as they were the”best” according to his childhood memories. This recipe is very close to all the recipes I’ve read on line. I’m so excited to get started tomorrow and surprise him with a wonderful Christmas memory. Thanks for the post.

    Reply
    • Lindsey
      December 23, 2015 at 10:52 am

      That is such a lovely gift idea, Jeanene! I am sure he will love them. The nut filling on these rolls is incredibly delicious! It makes a lot, so I froze some and made more later!

      Reply
  • Kim
    December 27, 2015 at 2:57 pm

    By freshly ground walnuts (finely), do you mean finely chopped? If not, how do you grind them?

    Reply
    • Lindsey
      December 29, 2015 at 11:43 am

      They were very finely chopped, which you can either do in a food processor or by hand, but this option will take awhile.

      Reply
    • JoAnn Beres Hertzig
      September 26, 2018 at 2:06 am

      Get yourself a handheld MOULI grater. They come out light as a feather without noticeable oil. Have used one for over 60 years

      Reply
      • sue
        November 24, 2018 at 5:56 pm

        JoAnn is correct. The Mouli hand grinder makes easy work of grinding oily nuts like walnuts, pecans and almonds–leaving a light and fluffy meal, an impossible texture to get when using a chopping knife. I use my Mouli when making Rum Balls which use vanilla wafer crumbs, powdered sugar and ground walnuts (and rum, of course).
        I love all the comments on this recipe; there are as many variations as there are families, and probably all are delicious!

        Reply
  • Lucy
    February 18, 2016 at 10:15 am

    Can the Hungarian Walnut Rolls be frozen?

    Reply
    • Lindsey
      February 19, 2016 at 1:38 pm

      Hi Lucy! They absolutely can be frozen! I also froze the extra filling to make more several months later when a craving struck

      Reply
      • Pam
        May 31, 2017 at 7:07 pm

        Can you make the dough in advance and keep in refrigerator for a couple days prior to making the rolls?

        Reply
        • Lindsey
          June 8, 2017 at 1:02 pm

          Absolutely! No more than 3 days or the dough begins to discolor. Happy baking, Pam!

          Reply
  • Anne
    June 17, 2016 at 12:09 pm

    Thanks for tweaking and tweaking, and giving us such accuracy. I, too, recall these, and have familial glee associated with them, which you have enough of, now. I’m making your version RIGHT NOW and need to ask about the filling. Mine is gritty from the sugar, which I don’t recall.

    While I have both of the “parts” made, next is assembly, and I’m going to have faith the sugar will dissolve during baking.

    And I’ll report back in an hour or so.

    But thanks again for taking care to pare down quantities for us. I feel good about your kitchen chemistry.

    Wish me luck.

    Anne

    Reply
    • Lindsey
      June 18, 2016 at 11:43 am

      Hi Anne! I do recall the filling being gritty from the sugar before it baked. Mine melted when it baked and didn’t taste gritty afterwards! How did it go? Happy baking!

      Reply
  • C.J. Cannon
    October 2, 2016 at 8:31 pm

    The ad at the bottom of the website covers your copyright. I have no website.

    Reply
    • Lindsey
      October 3, 2016 at 2:16 pm

      That doesn’t mean it isn’t there….

      Reply
  • Jerrie
    October 16, 2016 at 10:02 pm

    Oh wow my mother passed in 1974 and ive been searching for this recipe and hints to make this year for christmas! Its been that long since ive tasted them!! Im sure ill be crying in my kitchen cause youve taken me home!! Iwas 25 then im now 67!!! Im so grateful they look just like my sweet Hungarian moms soecial christmas cookies!!! Im so geecked!!

    Reply
    • Lindsey
      October 18, 2016 at 12:32 pm

      Hi Jerrie! What a touching comment. I’m so glad that my recipe could bring you a little bit of joy this holiday season. Please don’t forget to report back and let me know how it goes! You can also freeze extra filling for later in the year 🙂 Happy baking!

      Reply
  • Wrapping Blog
    November 18, 2016 at 3:57 am

    Sweet Scrolls Wrapping Papers 24 X 417

    […] nd her friends at Shoprite in Clark nj. Even I took some to work to treat my fri […]

    Reply
  • Jody Gayhart
    November 20, 2016 at 8:19 am

    Maybe someone knows… my grandmother made something very imilar to the walnut kolaches. However the ough also has e shaped them into a horn shape with the filling spilling out one end. My mother now in her 80’s so wants to taste that long remember Christmas treat.

    Reply
    • Vicki
      December 16, 2017 at 9:39 am

      My recipe is nut cookies, the dough is butter, sour cream and flour and filling Egg whites ground nuts and sugar. The dough is put together like pie crust and form small balls and rolled out in a circle and a dolip of nut filling put in Center and folded over , pinched, and curved to form a crescent and after taken out of oven, sprinkled with powdered sugar! My grandmothers family has made them for years, and I likewise. They are delicious 😋!

      Reply
      • Lindsey
        December 26, 2017 at 1:38 pm

        Thank you so much for taking the time to share your family’s tradition and recipe! I am still blown away how many people have memories making these types of cookies!

        Reply
    • Nyssa Unger
      December 24, 2017 at 7:05 am

      My mom always cut the rolled dough into 8ths and rolled them like crescent rolls, the filling will spread out of the ends and crisp a bit.

      I will have to try making it into squares like this recipe to see if I could get a more uniform shape

      Reply
      • Lindsey
        December 26, 2017 at 12:23 pm

        I can see rolling these like crescent rolls. And I think that would be delicious. I think the filling that spills out and caramelizes is the best part!

        Reply
    • sue
      November 24, 2018 at 6:01 pm

      I remember seeing something like this in a recipe book in the 60’s. My family is British, so we never made these, but mom indulged me and got the ingredients so I made them. I remember them being horn shaped sort of like a Corucopia? I remember the filling being egg whites, powdered sugar, cinnamon(?) and very finely chopped freshly cracked walnuts. Happy Holidays to you.

      Reply
  • Sissy
    November 21, 2016 at 1:03 pm

    Does the 1/2 pound of walnuts equal to 2 cups once ground fine? Thank you so much..These look delicious and I am in the middle of making these..LOL

    Reply
    • Lindsey
      November 21, 2016 at 5:55 pm

      Hi Sissy! I’m not sure how many cups 1/2 lbs walnuts finely ground is but if you weigh 1/2 lb walnuts and then grind them, it shouldn’t matter! Happy baking!

      Reply
      • Sissy
        November 21, 2016 at 10:26 pm

        Thank you…It came out just fine with the 2 cups of ground walnuts..LOL..Also, I made your Apricot filling from the dried Apricots, so, so good..Will never use a store bought brand again..Homemade is the way to go..Thanks for sharing all these wonderful recipes… Have a Happy Holiday Season to you and your Family & Friends..Thanks again..

        Reply
  • Klara Cramer
    November 24, 2016 at 10:04 am

    Thank you for this recipe. I’m originally Czech now married into a wonderful Canadian Jewish family. I find it fascinating how the cuisines of central Europe mash together and each country claiming it’s really theirs recipe 🙂
    I found several recipes on your website to incorporate in my this year’s very special Christmas baking and at the end they all are “just” traditional Jewish recipes, because it was very frequently the Jewish community that owned small businesses, especially bakeries.
    As I was reading your recipe I realized those were the beauties my mom used to bake for very special occasions, and the thing that rang the bell was the cream cheese in the dough. Thank you so much for posting this amazing recipe.
    I recall eating those with poppy seed filling, or even better baker’s cheese (more dense form of cream cheese), always dusted with confections sugar, always :))))
    I can’t wait to get baking

    Reply
  • Will Smith
    December 3, 2016 at 11:35 pm

    Great recipe; I’ve used it since discovery.

    My Grandmother and Grandfather were first gen Americans and my Mom, born in Hungari, baked like a true Austrian. Her cakes , cookies and spaetzile were incredible; her goulash to die for. Because of her I was popular in highschool for potential goodie trades at lunch. …rarely happened even though I knew I had more at home.

    We were a military family in more than name. While in Asia during the Vietnam War my father, a fight engineer to Vietnam arrived shortly brfore Christmas at my remote base with koulaches and prune pinwheels from Mom. The cookies and weird visit ( as in, how the heck he got there) was the best Christmas I ever experienced.

    Mom and Dad are gone, but I continue to cook Mom’s cookies every year for the rest of the family and they do not last.

    As an aside, a good walnut roll is close to nirvana.

    Reply
    • Lindsey
      December 5, 2016 at 8:58 am

      Hi Will! What a fantastic story! I love reading the comments on this recipe and the Apricot Kolaches more than any other posts on my blog. They inspire such vivid and wonderful memories of cooking with grandparents and parents. They make me smile every time. Thank you so much for sharing with me and also carrying on the traditions. Happy baking and Merry Christmas!

      Reply
  • Card Board Blog
    December 5, 2016 at 11:14 pm

    Sweet Scrolls Wrapping Papers 24

    […] when I make them. She passed in 2007. She was all Hungarian. We continue to coo […]

    Reply
  • teddi Irwin
    December 7, 2016 at 11:17 am

    Great recipes

    Reply
  • Janet Pennock
    December 10, 2016 at 6:56 am

    Can this be used as a “nut roll recipe”, if so how long would you bake them ?

    Reply
    • Lindsey
      December 20, 2016 at 8:27 pm

      Hi Janet! Hmmm I don’t see why not. That sounds delicious! I am not sure how long to bake them…I follow the 7 minute rule. Set the timer for 7 minutes and go from there. They will be puffed and matte when they are done. Just knowing the dough, you’ll be able to pick them up and check the bottom which should be golden brown when they are done. Hope that helps! Happy baking! Don’t forget to stop back and let me know how it goes!

      Reply
  • Nancy Tomazin
    December 10, 2016 at 1:56 pm

    I tried these today and the filling ran all out . I only used 1/4 cup milk and the filling was quite thick. Any ideas?
    Nancy

    Reply
    • Lindsey
      December 20, 2016 at 8:23 pm

      Hi Nancy, Some of my filling definitely ran out as you can see in the photos. I did let mine sit overnight in the fridge so it might have just thickened more than yours. The second time I made them I used the filling from the freezer and those didn’t spill out at all. Happy baking!

      Reply
  • Deborah Horvath Rowden
    December 15, 2016 at 1:06 pm

    My grandparents came from Hungary. My grandmother didn’t speak English but for a few words as we lived in a Hungarian community. The variation in Hungarian cuisine and baking is diverse due to region. everyone has their way of doing it. 😉
    My grandmother always made Kifli. A crescent shaped buttery rich pastry filled with walnut filling.
    Her dough was made with a pound of butter, a dozen egg yolks, half pint of heavy cream and a pinch of salt.
    The filling was the dozen egg whites beaten until firm peaks form and then she folded in a pound of sifted powdered sugar and about a pound, pound and half finely ground walnuts. She would roll the dough into balls the size of large walnuts and refrigerate overnight. Then the rolling and filling and baking began! 🙂 When she took them out of the oven they were well dusted with powdered sugar. A family tradition I have continued and now with my 13 year old granddaughter who loves to bake! <3

    Reply
    • Lindsey
      December 20, 2016 at 8:07 pm

      Hi Deborah! What a wonderful comment filled with memories and also a recipe that I MUST try!!! It is so heartwarming to hear that you are passing along that tradition with your granddaughter! I plan to do the same when I have the opportunity. Love from my family to yours. Have a wonderful holiday!

      Reply
    • Vicki
      December 16, 2017 at 9:44 am

      This is how mine are made except in place of heavy cream, sour cream!

      Reply
      • Lindsey
        December 26, 2017 at 1:34 pm

        Another reader said the same thing! I can’t wait to try that!

        Reply
  • Deborah Horvath Rowden
    December 15, 2016 at 1:08 pm

    Could these be filled with apricot or raspberry jam?

    Reply
    • Lindsey
      December 20, 2016 at 8:02 pm

      Absolutely!!!!!

      Reply
  • Cindy
    December 15, 2016 at 6:02 pm

    I just finished making these. They taste wonderful….but most of them “popped open”. The 1 1/2″ square is really small. And I used 1/2 teas of filling. I even made them bigger and most of them still came open. And I pinched the heck out of them to stay shut. 🙂 But they sure taste good. Also I had a lot of dough left to roll out more. Does that sound right? Any help would be appreciated. TY for the recipe….I need practice.

    Reply
    • Lindsey
      December 20, 2016 at 8:00 pm

      Hi Cindy! That seems to be a common problem. Some of mine definitely popped open too. I bet if we “cheated” and used a bit of eggwash to seal them shut they wouldn’t pop open. Happy baking!

      Reply
      • Erin
        May 5, 2017 at 6:02 pm

        Here is a trick to seal them. After you cut your squares and fill them, lightly fold over one side (I do all at one time). Then using a small artist paint brush lightly brush the folded tip, then fold the next side on top of it and very gently pinch the very tip of the top layer into the lower dough. I wet about 2-3 at a time. Works great.

        Reply
        • Lindsey
          May 9, 2017 at 11:16 am

          That is an excellent tip, Erin! Thank you so much for commenting! Happy baking!

          Reply
  • Mary Ann Barnett
    December 16, 2016 at 6:36 pm

    I’ve got to get this recipe down and passed on in memory of my grandma. I didn’t catch the temperature setting for the oven? 350-375?

    Reply
    • Lindsey
      December 20, 2016 at 7:51 pm

      375 is good 🙂 I am so happy to hear this recipe will because part of your family favorites! Happy baking!

      Reply
  • […] Authentic Hungarian Walnut Roll Recipe […]

    Reply
  • Rae Solomon
    December 18, 2016 at 11:36 am

    These are Jewish cookies and we call them Rugelach

    Reply
    • Lindsey
      December 20, 2016 at 7:46 pm

      So many names for similar recipes! The sous chef at my last restaurant made rugelach but his had chocolate! sooooo delicious! Happy holidays, Rae.

      Reply
  • Sally
    December 22, 2016 at 11:19 pm

    Made these tonight and they are delicious! However I had a lot of trouble with them unrolling and opening up during baking. Any helpful hints would be appreciated. Thanks!

    Reply
    • Lindsey
      December 23, 2016 at 12:01 am

      Hi Sally! You could try a little egg wash (an egg beaten with a little milk) to seal the edges! Happy baking!

      Reply
  • Margaret
    December 24, 2016 at 3:16 pm

    These look a lot like the cookies my Nana called “kifli” and always made at Christmas! I’ve been looking all over for a recipe, but kept finding something that looked a lot more like a rich sweet bread in a crescent shape with a ground walnut filling. Your recipe gives a result that most resembles what I remember. I’m determined to try them as soon as possible!

    Nana grew up in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, and for family history purposes, I really wish I could figure out who taught Nana to make kifli, beigli and palacsinta–her much-older stepsister (from Alsoor in Burgenland) or the lady Nana was sent to live with when her mother died, who came from Oroszlany. When she married my Greek grandfather, she also learned to make baklava, spanakopita, and cookies like finikia from my great-aunt and other Greek ladies in the family.

    Reply
  • cindy
    December 29, 2016 at 10:03 am

    Do these cookie’s need to be kept refrigerated ?

    Reply
  • Amy McStay
    March 7, 2017 at 10:23 am

    Can’t wait to try these!!! We called them Nut Babies and they are one of my favorite memories of childhood. I have tried many store bought cookies that look similar, but the pastry is always wrong. Thank you.

    Reply
  • Lisa
    August 24, 2017 at 1:01 pm

    I would love to make these for my daughters wedding Sept 22nd. Do these freez well?

    Reply
    • Lindsey
      September 20, 2017 at 6:54 pm

      Yes! Though her wedding is in 2 days! I hope you made them! Best wishes to your daughter 🙂

      Reply
  • Satin Blog
    October 4, 2017 at 12:01 am

    Black Cracked Ice Rolls

    […] rything Hungarian. Anyways, she made the best walnut rolls ever. And it was call […]

    Reply
  • Nut Rolls – Diet My Way
    December 8, 2017 at 3:17 pm

    […] This is a plate of 24 nut rolls, the recipe makes 96, so you can make half of the batch if you don’t need this many. They are 85 calories each. They are similar to these Hungarian Nut Rolls. […]

    Reply
  • Mary Ann
    December 19, 2017 at 2:37 pm

    I have made these before but the dough always unfolds and makes a big mess no matter what we do to keep them closed. Any suggestions?

    Reply
    • Lindsey
      December 26, 2017 at 1:11 pm

      Hi Mary Ann, I usually just pinch but you could use a little egg wash or heavy cream to try to adhere them better. Happy baking!

      Reply
  • Patricia stanczyc
    December 20, 2017 at 12:04 pm

    My grandma Szabo used to make these too. Thank you so much for the recipe!

    Reply
    • Lindsey
      December 26, 2017 at 1:07 pm

      YOu are most welcome! I hope they were just as good as you remembered!

      Reply
  • Gail Punturo
    December 21, 2017 at 7:13 am

    I see all the comments, but not recipe. Am I not looking in the right place?

    Reply
    • Lindsey
      December 26, 2017 at 1:05 pm

      Hi Gail, It is in the main post right above where the comments start.

      Reply
  • G
    December 21, 2017 at 6:44 pm

    Dough was too sticky and soft cookies were sloppy and broke on top while baking.. baking time was much more than the 12-14 minutes suggested..too sweet filling.. the picture looks wonderful but my end product looked horrible, ended up tossing them.. waste of product and time.. hope others had better luck.. couldn’t serve these..

    Reply
    • Lindsey
      December 26, 2017 at 1:04 pm

      Well, I’m sorry you had trouble with the recipe. Perhaps just a measuring error.

      Reply
      • Thomas
        December 26, 2017 at 2:16 pm

        The dough gets soft and sticky when it gets warm. You have to keep it cold and work fast.
        I just cut with a straight line, not serrated. I put the seam down, and no issues breaking.

        They are small and yes, sweet. see below for a less sweet, egg based variation.

        Oh, and no matter what they look like they taste great. The mistakes/error are what you keep for yourself, or give to a shelter. I’d never throw food out because it didn’t look pretty.

        Reply
  • Thomas
    December 21, 2017 at 6:58 pm

    This looks like wgat I made wuth my mother, who made befire with her mother, supposedly a Slovakian recipe.

    Had a different name, but I’ve been searching for years for it. First I’ve found that matches my 30 year old memories (at least that long since I last made them)

    Will try in the coming days. Hope I’ve fi ally found it.

    Reply
    • Lindsey
      December 26, 2017 at 1:03 pm

      I hope you have too, Thomas!

      Reply
      • Thomas
        December 26, 2017 at 2:10 pm

        They came out great, though small. Not a bad thing though. The crust to filling ratio gives a different taste.

        Turns out it’s not the same recipe. Right after I made these, a distant relative posted they had made the right one and I now have that recipe too. The name I was after is Rozkī.

        Difference in the cream cheese and sour cream is minor, though the sour cream add a tang. They are less sweet (no sugar in filling) but your recipe is creamier with the butter and milk. I plan to make a small batch (1/3) and then start tweaking to merge the two.

        Rozkī.
        Dough:
        6 egg yolks
        6 cups flour
        1lb butter
        1 pint sour cream
        pinch of salt.

        Filling:
        6 egg whites
        1lb finely chopped walnuts
        1 teaspoon of vanilla extract

        Roll 1″ balls of dough in powered sugar. Fill (~!tsp) roll up and bake @ 350 for 15-20 min

        Reply
        • Lindsey
          December 26, 2017 at 11:48 pm

          I can’t wait to try that! I think a little tanginess with the sweet filling would be welcome

          Reply
  • Cathleen Orr
    December 22, 2017 at 11:09 am

    My mom, daughter and I made a double batch of these !! My grandmother was from Hungary and each year spent many hours making these Kifli, Kolach and other wonderful treats.When I was little girl, I sat with her to watch and learn and get the recipe, but grandma didn’t measure, so I never got the recipe. It’s been many years since she passed, and I miss the Kolach the most, but thought we’d start by making the Kifli. The first bite I took brought me right back to my childhood and filled my heart with warmth and happiness! I hope to pass this feeling onto my daughter and grand-daughter!! They were DELICIOUS!

    Reply
    • Lindsey
      December 26, 2017 at 12:59 pm

      Hi Cathleen, What a heartwarming comment. Thank you so much for taking the time to post your experience and also your memories. I am so glad to have brought you and your family joy during the holidays!

      Reply
  • Mary
    December 22, 2017 at 12:39 pm

    My mother filled the cookies with 3 c walnuts, 1 bottle of pineapple preserves, and 2 beaten eggs. Very sweett and moist. Surprising her recipe was the same as yours except she did not add salt. My mother was raised in Slovenia which was a part of Austria Hungary when she was a little girl.

    Reply
    • Lindsey
      December 26, 2017 at 12:58 pm

      Hi Mary, A bottle of pineapple preserves sounds fantastic in the filling. A really nice substitute for granulated sugar. I think it is fascinating how much of Eastern Europe made a cookie similar, if not the same, as this one!

      Reply
  • Casey
    December 22, 2017 at 1:38 pm

    Thank you for this recipe. My friends mom made these at Christmas and started my Christmas cookie baking tradition which now takes 3 days and 8 recipes plus 3 candy recipes. I thought I remember her having bigger pieces of nuts. I ground mine like yours says but I wonder if it’s too fine and should start over. I used a blender and they are more like coffee grounds. Should I start over and use finely chopped? Also I thought her dough used yeast is that possibly another way of making these?

    Reply
    • Lindsey
      December 26, 2017 at 12:56 pm

      Hi Casey,
      Sorry I just saw this. I hope you went ahead and used them, I bet they still made a delightful filling. IF you didn’t and you still have the grounds you can use them in place of almond meal in recipe for a walnut twist or you can keep processing them into walnut butter!

      Reply
    • Thomas
      December 26, 2017 at 2:22 pm

      I used a blender too. Not coffee ground fine, but very small pieces. Worked great.
      Just had to do small amounts. The oil in the nuts makes it clump up quick.
      Then I picked out the bigger pieces (more than 1/8″) and chopped them again.

      The taste is spread through out evenly but doesn’t feel like eating nuts.

      I did the same for Mexican Wedding Cakes, which came out great too.

      Reply
  • Bev
    December 26, 2017 at 10:05 pm

    Thank you for this recipe. Although it is now too late for this Christmas, they will go in my Christmas Cookie file. And I plan on making about a half recipe to make sure I have it right. I love making cookies for Christmas and love the original favorites as well as those from other countries. I am of German descent but my parents moved to Russia at some point and my parents were both born there. They emigrated to the US when still young. So cookies my Mom made were influenced from different countries. I find that many of them are very similar.

    Reply
    • Lindsey
      December 26, 2017 at 11:50 pm

      Well hopefully you will pull this one out of that file next Christmas and they will be a hit! You can make the apricot kolaches with the same dough if you want!

      Reply
  • Soni Biehl
    January 15, 2018 at 4:28 pm

    I just came upon this sight. I grew up in a town of eastern Europeans in Pennsylvania. They made walnut roll every Christmas. http://cheflindseyfarr.com/2014/02/authentic-hungarian-walnut-rolls/ These aren’t walnut rolls, they are walnut cookies. 🙂

    Reply
  • Jo Anne T
    March 24, 2018 at 10:04 am

    These are not just traditional Hungarian cookies because my Slovak maternal grandmother from the region just above Bratislava used to make these. They are firmly a tradition in my family also!

    Reply
    • Lindsey
      March 28, 2018 at 3:37 pm

      I’m so glad, Jo Anne!

      Reply
  • Andrea Nemes
    May 6, 2018 at 7:57 pm

    Lindsey, I made these about a year ago (and then couldn’t find the recipe for some reason) they were AMAZING! I enjoy baking but I’ve never made kifli before, it looked so intimidating, I was worried they wouldn’t turn out but I was pleasantly surprised! My Magyar family loved them, so kudos to you on the recipe and me for following it! Thanks so much for sharing! Going to make again tomorrow and much more often, now that I found the recipe again! 😊

    Reply
    • Lindsey
      May 8, 2018 at 2:46 pm

      Hi Andrea! I am so glad you found the recipe again and that you and your family loved them!! Happy baking!

      Reply
  • […] These Hungarian Walnut Rolls have a delicately flakey yet rich crust, and an incredibly sweet, irresistible walnut filling! Check out the recipe below. Enjoy! Authentic Hungarian Walnut Roll Recipe […]

    Reply
  • Crystal
    August 17, 2018 at 4:52 pm

    Could you make these and freeze the before baking? I wanted to make for my daughters wedding but wanted to bake fresh that week. I would make it as recipe calls for then freeze and bake them from a frozen state then dust with sugar after they are baked. Help appreciated.

    Reply
    • Lindsey
      August 19, 2018 at 11:02 am

      100% Crystal! I see no reason why not! Now because your butter will be so cold, your dough might puff more (like puff pastry!) which could cause more to open up. I say secure the closure with egg wash (1 egg, pinch of salt, teaspoon of milk – whisked together) before freezing and you will be golden!

      Reply
  • Crystal
    August 19, 2018 at 7:27 pm

    Thank you. I’ll let you k is how they turn out.

    Reply
  • JoAnn Beres Hertzig
    September 26, 2018 at 2:00 am

    My grandparents on both sides came from Hungary. My recipe has been passed down for generations. We never used cream cheese, and I am wondering how they made cream cheese in the 1800’s and earlier? Authentic from what era? Just wondering. The way we always grind our walnuts is with a handheld Mouli grater. They come out light as a feather.

    Reply
  • Paula
    November 23, 2018 at 9:11 am

    My Grandmother was Hungarian and each of ur pictures made me see her hands as she delicately would cut and roll thousands of these cookies for Christmas! Thanks for sharing! I make them but they are never as pretty as hers were.

    Reply
    • Lindsey
      December 5, 2018 at 10:43 am

      Aww Paula! Thank you for your sweet comment! I can feel the love for your Grandmother in your words! I bet yours will become as pretty as hers with as much practice!

      Reply
  • Mich Lueken
    November 29, 2018 at 2:09 pm

    My grandparents came over on ‘the boat’ in 1924 from Hungary. We’ve been making these cookies at Christmas every year for generations. We call them Hungarian nut horns. I’m the last one to make them and am hoping one of my sons will continue the tradition. Our recipe is basically the same. The only difference is, we use heavy cream and don’t heat it. Instead of using flour to roll it out, we use powdered sugar.
    Thank you for sharing this recipe. I love finding recipes from my heritage !
    Have a very merry Christmas 🎄

    Reply
    • Lindsey
      December 5, 2018 at 10:41 am

      Merry Christmas to you too! I am sure if you teach your sons how to make them and share the love you clearly have for your heritage, they will carry on the tradition proudly with their families!

      Reply
  • Anonymouise
    November 30, 2018 at 2:16 pm

    While these are very nice, they are NOT walnut rolls. They are kiffles, or kiffli. Walnut rolls are just that – rolls of yeast dough with walnut filling. When sliced, they look like spirals.

    Reply
  • TK
    December 7, 2018 at 4:06 pm

    My people used sour cream and when not that used cream cheese.,some baking pwd. and egg yolks in the horns.

    Reply
  • Anonymous
    December 12, 2018 at 5:09 pm

    Hi Lindsey,

    Happy to report that your apricot kolaches were a huge hit at last year’s Christmas festivities. Everyone loved them! I hope I get a chance to attempt these walnut kifli.

    Wondering if you have a recipe for Hungarian Beigli? I assume the filling is very similar to the walnut filling but with a pastry of sweet yeast dough.

    Love your recipes thanks for sharing them! 💜

    Reply
    • Lindsey
      December 12, 2018 at 6:50 pm

      I’m so glad!!! I haven’t heard of Beigli! But I am certainly going to put it on my to make list! Happy holidays and happy baking!

      Reply
  • Marilee Chipoletti
    December 13, 2018 at 12:34 am

    My grandmother was from Austria-Hungry and was born 1901. She made these often and it was something I asked for when it was my birthday. I have a recipe, but it is not like hers. I am going to try this recipe in the next week. My problem is getting the flaky crust. I know she cooked with lard and I’m sure that made a big difference in the pastry. Thanks for posting the recipe and notes!

    Reply
    • Lindsey
      December 15, 2018 at 4:55 pm

      Ahh lard! So magical in pastry and so hard to get! Happy baking!

      Reply
  • Geoffrey Stallman
    December 15, 2018 at 3:32 am

    Wow !! It’s great 🙂

    Reply
    • Lindsey
      December 15, 2018 at 4:47 pm

      I’m so glad you enjoyed them!!

      Reply
  • Cyndee
    December 17, 2018 at 4:55 pm

    They’re just out of the oven, and I sampled my first one. Though mine aren’t quite as pretty as yours (though they’re still cute), they taste absolutely delicious! My Czech hubby will surely love them. He said they make something similar in his country.

    I actually only made 1/4 of a batch and have almost 50 cookies. I think that perhaps some of mine were rolled too thin. They are small, but I cut them 1.5 ” square as you directed. I used a special square cookie cutter, which made cutting them out easy. For the number I made, the filling amount was perfect, using your directed 1/2 tsp, exactly, per cookie. My last 6 or 8 cookies made actually melted while baking. I attribute that to a combination of those being rolled extra thin, and the dough too warm. Certainly scraps to be later used, and other “disks” of dough need to be kept in the fridge as long as possible.

    Reply
    • Lindsey
      January 1, 2019 at 11:21 am

      I’m so glad you enjoyed them! Great tips! I think you make some very good points about the thickness of the dough and chilling your scraps. That is super important! I’m going to update the recipe! THank you! Happy new year!

      Reply
  • Monica
    December 22, 2018 at 7:36 am

    These are fabulous. I have wanted to make these for years but never found a recipe that got my interest. This is the one and only I will ever use. Thank you.

    Reply
    • Lindsey
      January 1, 2019 at 11:10 am

      That makes me so happy to hear Monica! Happy New Year!

      Reply
  • George O Greenwood
    June 27, 2019 at 3:07 am

    Gosh, so many variations. I prefer to make the Patko version, much less work (Google it). No cream cheese, but sour cream, yeast, 6 egg yolks, baking powder, butter. Filling, ground walnuts, cinnamon and ground clove (secret ingredient). This was my Hungarian grandmother’s recipe, passed down to my mother and her siblings, then to us grandkids! I didn’t give quantities of anything, but I’m sure the Google experts will give you what you need. Baking is about 24 min at 375.
    George

    Reply
  • Lorrie Ridenour
    August 17, 2019 at 12:31 pm

    I need to make cookies for my daughters wedding…wondering how these cookies freeze. Do you think it would be okay to freeze them?

    Reply
    • Lindsey
      September 2, 2019 at 9:39 am

      Absolutely, Lorrie! You can also freeze the dough, but for a wedding it would be easier the freeze the whole cookie.

      Reply
  • D Eileen
    October 24, 2019 at 2:23 am

    I make a Polish version of your cookie. The dough is almost the same, but the filling doesn’t have butter, or milk. It has sugar and walnuts in equal parts. I put them in golf ball size balls refrigerate them over night and roll them out with flour. This makes a large cookie in the shape of a banana. Hence we always called them Polish Pastry Bananas. Right out of the oven heavily powered with powdered sugar. I also make them with other types of nuts, but walnuts are traditional. Also the cookie may be filled with preserves, I like raspberry the best.

    Reply
    • Lindsey
      November 21, 2019 at 11:09 am

      Thank you for sharing! Those sound delightful!

      Reply
  • m graves
    October 28, 2019 at 10:43 am

    The melted butter is that a filling ingredient or brushed on the rolls, it doesn’t say , just want to make sure it is a filling ingredient?
    Thank you.

    Reply
    • Lindsey
      November 21, 2019 at 11:07 am

      It goes into the walnut filling. Happy baking!

      Reply
      • m graves
        November 21, 2019 at 2:45 pm

        Dear Lindsey
        Thank you so much for replying! They look delicious!

        Reply
        • Lindsey
          November 21, 2019 at 4:16 pm

          You are most welcome!

          Reply
          • Jean
            December 9, 2019 at 5:22 pm

            I just finished making 8 colachi and have walnuts left over. My husband said “i wish i knew how my mother would make Horns”. i never thought i would find a recipe for them, so thank you for publishing this! I am going to attempt this tonight!

          • Lindsey
            February 10, 2020 at 5:44 pm

            Don’t you love how these things work out! I hope you both enjoyed them!

  • Katherine
    November 30, 2019 at 7:44 am

    My grandfathers family came over from Slovakia, with many relatives still there. My grandmother made these for every holiday or large family gathering. Her recipe is a bit different, especially the yeast (not proofed, just add3d dry) in the dough. She would primarily make the larger version, which would be rolled into a spiral then sliced down for serving.
    As kids, well, and still now, my sisters and I prefer the small version as they are more crisp and sugary. Also, grandmas filling was a simple ground walnut and honey mixture…. kind of a Slovakian version of baklava. Try it and they will become your holiday favorites!

    Reply
    • Lindsey
      February 10, 2020 at 5:51 pm

      I certainly will! THank you Katherine

      Reply
  • Emily
    December 17, 2019 at 10:58 pm

    This is the identical pastry recipe (quantities and ingredients) as the one I got from my husbands Hungarian Family, who were bakers in Pittsburgh. They immigrated in the early 1900’s. I don’t know when they started using cream cheese, but that version has been around in their family since at least the sixties and prob way before that- I would ask but all are deceased. The filling we use is just 1/3 sugar to 2/3 walnuts. We grind them in the food processor until the sugar and the nuts have creamed and there’s no trace of grittiness. Then you just add a little tiny bit of water Into a small bowl of nuts as you’re working the filling onto the squares. We do the tiny square version but I’m going to try the pizza slice version and roll them into crescents. Also, when done baking, my husbands grandmother would dust them with sanding sugar for a bit of sugary crunch

    Reply
    • Lindsey
      February 10, 2020 at 5:39 pm

      You can never go wrong with a bit of sugary crunch! Sounds delicious Emily!

      Reply
  • Lisa
    December 18, 2019 at 4:48 am

    I made these last year and my family absolutely loved them! These will be on my Christmas cookie list ever year. Thank you so much for sharing.

    Reply
    • Lindsey
      February 10, 2020 at 5:38 pm

      That makes me so happy to hear, Lisa!

      Reply
  • Linda
    December 19, 2019 at 5:50 pm

    Will hurt to leave the pastry in the frigid overnight

    Reply
    • Lindsey
      February 10, 2020 at 5:37 pm

      Absolutely!

      Reply
  • Anonymous
    December 20, 2019 at 2:37 pm

    These looked gorgeous in your photos but did not work out for me at all. The dough was too thin and yet still raw after baking, the cookies were ‘skimpy’ looking, the sugar on the dough while rolling made it too dry so that it would not stick well while trying to shape these, the temperature recommended left these burnt after only 10 minutes. Total nightmare and waste of money & time.💔

    Reply
  • Lynn
    May 20, 2020 at 5:25 pm

    I found this on Pinterest. Because I am self-isolating, I thought why not bake these lovely gems. Bringing a little Christmas to my home. And, oh my goodness, these Hungsrian Walnut Rolls are delicious!! Everyone loved them so I am making another batch. Thank you.

    P.S. I didn’t roll the dough quite thin enough the first time, but they were still oh so fine!😃

    Reply
    • Lindsey
      May 20, 2020 at 6:01 pm

      I love that, Lynn! Bringing a little Christmas into your home during this time! I am so glad you enjoyed them and are making another batch! Happy baking!

      Reply
      • Mary Ann A Barnett
        May 21, 2020 at 11:40 am

        I had frozen leftover walnut filling from a batch done in Jan-Feb 2020. Defrosted it, made a half portion of this dough and instead of little crescents made a nut roll (usually done with a yeast dough). Sprinkle sugar over all before rolling, monitored it in the oven. Had a few cracks, but golden brown and done nicely. Sprinkled it with more sugar while cooling. Still had that “divine” Hungarian Walnut Roll taste!

        Reply
        • Lindsey
          May 21, 2020 at 12:07 pm

          NIce!!! I think freezing the filling is a game changer! It makes the next batch so fast

          Reply
  • Mara
    May 23, 2020 at 2:53 pm

    Everytime I make the filling it’s very runny…is it supposed to be so messy of a filling?

    Reply
    • Lindsey
      May 24, 2020 at 2:14 pm

      Hi Mara,
      No, it is should be rather thick. Be sure to follow the instructions and start with only half of the milk. Then add more as needed. It also thickens as it cools

      Reply
  • Shelby
    September 26, 2020 at 8:07 am

    I just found this recipe on Pinterest. I am already in heaven with this and won’t be able to make for a couple of months however it will be one of the first things I do Make. I loved reading all of the reviews and comments which made this even more special! For all of you who left comments sharing family memories all I can say is thank you!

    Reply
    • Lindsey
      September 29, 2020 at 9:17 am

      I couldn’t agree more, Shelby! I hope you enjoy when you do have the time to make them!

      Reply
  • Sher
    October 26, 2020 at 12:23 am

    I live in a very hot and humid climate so sometimes it’s hard to get pastries to turn out right. Would I be able to use canned biscuit dough (Grands) and roll it out for the dough?

    Reply
    • Lindsey
      October 26, 2020 at 5:02 pm

      You could certainly try but, honestly, this dough is about as low maintenance as they come. I would stress about it too much. If you have doubts, you could always chill before you bake them. Though in this case, sometimes they will puff too much and cause them to open up. Same with the kolaches

      Reply
      • Sher
        October 26, 2020 at 11:40 pm

        Thanks, I’ll try them both ways! They look too delicious not to.

        Reply

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